LDS

Here are 130+ of best quotes by LDS prophets.

Joseph Smith

1st LDS Church President, served 1830-1844

  • “When you climb up a ladder, you must begin at the bottom and ascend step by step, until you arrive at the top; and so it is with the principles of the Gospel– you must begin with the first, and go on until you learn all the principles of exaltation. But it will be a great while after you have passed through the veil before you will have learned them. It will be a great work to learn our salvation and exaltation even beyond the grave.”
  • “Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it; and this path is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, holiness, and keeping all the commandments of God.”
  • “Whatever God requires is right, no matter what it is, although we may not see the reason there of until all of the events transpire.”
  • “A man is saved no faster than he gains knowledge”
  • “When God commands, do it!”
  • “We say that God is true; that the Constitution of the United States is true; that the Bible is true; and that the Book of Mormon is true, and that Christ is true”
  • “The best way to obtain truth and wisdom is not to ask from books, but to go to God in prayer, and obtain divine teaching.”
  • “You don’t know me; you never knew my heart. No man knows my history. I cannot tell it: I shall never undertake it. I don’t blame any one for not believing my history. If I had not experienced what I have, I would not have believed it myself. I never did harm any man since I was born in the world. My voice is always for peace.”
  • “God himself, finding he was in the midst of spirits and glory, because he was more intelligent, saw proper to institute laws whereby the rest could have a privilege to advance like himself. The relationship we have with God places us in a situation to advance in knowledge. He has power to institute laws to instruct the weaker intelligences, that they may be exalted with Himself, so that they might have one glory upon another, and all that knowledge, power, glory, and intelligence, which is requisite in order to save them in the world of spirits. (King Follett Discourse) ”
  • “It is our duty to concentrate all our influence to make popular that which is sound and good, and unpopular that which is unsound. ”
  • “God judges men according to the use they make of the light which He gives them.”

—View the 130+ top quotes by LDS prophets—

Here are 300+ of the best quotes by President Henry B. Eyring, organized by topic (A-Z). These quotes represent some of President Eyring’s most powerful messages from General Conference talks, First Presidency messages, BYU Devotionals, etc.

quotes-president-eyring

Quotes About Education By President Henry B. Eyring

Quotes From “Education For Real Life” (May 2001 CES Fireside)

  • When we put God’s purposes first, He will give us miracles. If we pray to know what He would have us do next, He will multiply the effects of what we do in such a way that time seems to be expanded.
  • It takes neither modern technology nor much money to seize the opportunity to learn in the moments we now waste. You could just have a book and paper and pencil with you. That will be enough. But you need determination to capture the leisure moments you now waste.
  • Too often we use many hours for fun and pleasure, clothed in the euphemism “I’m recharging my batteries.” Those hours could be spent reading and studying to gain knowledge, skills, and culture.
  • Our education must never stop. If it ends at the door of the classroom on graduation day, we will fail.
  • We cannot waste time entertaining ourselves when we have the chance to read or to listen to whatever will help us learn what is true and useful. Insatiable curiosity will be our hallmark.
  • A great teacher is always studying.

—-View all 300+ quotes from President Henry B. Eyring—-

Here are some of the best LDS Pick-up lines around.

  1. “What’s your favorite temple? I’m looking at mine!”
  2. “A date with me is like a temple, and you have a recommend.”
  3. “I was reading the Book of Numbers last night, and I realized I don’t have yours.”
  4. “I will treat you how I treat my scriptures. With care and love.”
  5. “You are my Pearl of Great Price.” 
  6. “Are you the iron rod? Cause I wanna hold onto you for the rest of eternity.”
    -1 Nephi 8:24 “And it came to pass that I beheld others pressing forward, and they came forth and caught hold of the end of the rod of iron; and they did press forward through the mist of darkness, clinging to the rod of iron, even until they did come forth and partake of the tree.”
  7. “The tree of life called. It wants its sweetness back.”
    1 Nephi 8: 10-11 “And it came to pass that I beheld a tree whose fruit was desireable to make one happy. And it came to pass that I did go forth and partake of the fruit thereof; and I beheld that it was most sweet, above all that I ever before tasted.”
  8. “You remind me of the fruit in Lehi’s dream. You are the most precious of all.”
    1 Nephi: 15:36 “Wherefore, the wicked are rejected from the righteous, and also from that tree of life, whose fruit is most precious and most desireable above all other fruits.”

**View all of the 50+ LDS Pick-Up Lines**

In 1975, Dr. Raymond A. Moody coined the term “near-death experiences” in his bestselling book Life After Life.

Mormons have latched on to this concept, which is not surprising, considering our unique doctrine regarding the afterlife.

Dr. Brent Top has researched extensively near-death experiences, especially by those outside of the LDS community.

He has identified several common elements to these experiences such as the “life review,” encountering loved ones, and spirit communication.

Far from fading as a fad, the topic is becoming more and more popular.

While Dr. Top finds his studies interesting, he warns of the danger of trying to establish doctrine through experience. He emphasizes what the LDS doctrine is regarding the afterlife rather than anecdotal experiences. He also introduces a concept he coined as the “Apocraphal Principle” to help us evaluate these stories.

 

In the LDS Church, we have high expectations and high ideals. Leaders do not shy away from teaching a very specific ideal family constellation, sexual purity before marriage, and patterning our life after the Savior’s life in every possible way. There is nothing wrong with teaching ideals and one could argue that that is the primary job of religious institutions. However, in real life, holding up ideals often leaves members never feeling  “good enough” because they have not achieved the ideal righteous Mormon life. Chronic feelings of  “never good enough” because your life doesn’t look like an Ensign magazine cover, your child has left the Church, your spouse isn’t committed to church callings, you’re struggling with the word of wisdom, you’re having difficulty forgiving someone, you’re not a good provider, or you’re not an attentive mother or father, can erode our whole sense of self.

What is shame?

Shame is a universal emotion defined by researcher Brené Brown, PhD as “the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging – something we’ve experienced, done, or failed to do makes us unworthy of connection.” Shame inspires us to hide ourselves from others, to judge ourselves and to go deeper into secretive behaviors.

Shame triggers

Religious institutions are not the only place we get messages about ideals. We are bombarded with messages about how we “should” be–what ideal women and men look like and act like, what the ideal house and household looks like, how your children should behave and more. Not living up to our ideal identity or how we want to view ourselves and be viewed by others has been identified as the primary trigger for shame.

One of my ideal identities is the desire to be viewed as a “good mother.” If I am not behaving as a “good mother” – if I’m being preoccupied with work, forgetting their doctor appointment, or losing my patience– my ideal identity is challenged and I am susceptible to feelings of shame. Shame can be triggered not only by how we view ourselves, but also by how we think others view us.

What’s wrong with shame?

You may be thinking, “What’s the problem with feeling shame when you don’t measure up to your ideal? Doesn’t that make you want to change?” No, shame does not inspire self-improvement. It most often initiates and fuels self-destructive behavior. Chronic feelings of shame are present in toxic perfectionism, eating disorders, problematic sexual behaviors, substance abuse, and sexual abuse. Over time, shame can become integrated into our self-image, into our core experience of who we are (not what we have done).

Where shame gets particularly tricky for Mormons is that while we can discount the world’s messages about our ideal selves as shallow, uninspired and sometimes downright evil, faithful members can’t easily discount the ideals put forward by inspired Church leaders. Nor should we. How do we accept the ideals set forth by our Church leaders without spiraling into self-destructive shame because we don’t measure up?

1. Draw clear distinctions between ideal and real

I am not suggesting that we throw away the ideals presented by our doctrine and teachings. What I am suggesting is that we overtly discuss that the image of an ideal family, ideal mother, ideal priesthood holder, ideal child or teen as something to strive for, not to actually achieve anytime soon. I have seen the damaging consequences of believing that the religious ideal is actually attainable in this life contribute to destructive perfectionism, depression, anxiety, low self-worth, and shame. Dr. Brené Brown suggests that “healthy striving” toward a goal is very different than toxic perfectionism.

As an adolescent, I recognized my blessed and privileged life and yet, for a period of time, I still wasn’t happy. I concluded that something must be inherently wrong with me. I started to experience deep feelings of shame–that I was somehow flawed because I went through periods where I wasn’t able to feel joy and gratitude. I have the Gospel. I should be happy. I slid into several years of toxic perfectionism, denying my emotions, and hiding my authentic self.

Read full story by Dr. Julie De Azevedo Hanks on Meridian Magazine.

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Cover image via BGR and Shutterstock found via ldsmag.com

In the wake of the deaths of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds (Daughter and mother) just a day apart, Huffington Post published a surprisingly open article concerning the LDS beliefs about eternity from author Mary Bell. 

We’re all here on Earth for about 10 minutes. OK, not 10 actual minutes. But relative to eternity, doesn’t it seem like it’s going to feel like we were here for just minutes?

Ideally, we would like these minutes to be… well, ideal. We would like to be consistently overflowing with joy, bursting with happiness, and swimming in purpose―like joyful, happy porpoises with retirement plans. But life, as we’ve noticed, can also be hard. And that, as I continue to learn, is “a good thing” (thank you, Martha Stewart).

Recently, I was in a situation with a lot of people that I loved but hadn’t seen for a while. It was joy to see them again. We were waiting for something to begin, and we were all trying hard to be quiet, but still, we were a little covertly giggly. I remember thinking, “This reminds me of being a little girl with my many siblings gathered around me, waiting for bedtime stories to begin.” We needed to settle down so the book could be read, but we were all so excited! We were all there in our pajamas! We were all snuggled near each other like happy puppies! We had a hard time stifling laughter.

I was remembering this that day when something suddenly surprising whispered to my soul. “Someday you will feel this with all those with you in heaven, for everyone is a literal child of God. You are all brothers and sisters.”

It hit me: love in heaven does not come just from God and Jesus and people of that caliber. It comes from the multiplied love of all of us. Individual relationships (deep, pure, and fun) are possible between each of us.

To read the full article on the Huffington Post, click here. 

Thanks to Meridian Magazine that brought this article to our attention.

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Mormon Missionaries Soul Pancake
YouTube screenshot from Soul Pancake channel

A YouTube channel widely known for their Kid President videos, Soul Pancake, set up a piano on a street corner and put some holiday sheet music on it to see who might show up and play something. They got plenty of people to come play and sing. What we didn’t expect was to find two LDS missionaries with name tags on the video playing Christmas songs!

We all love a Mormon featured on the news or in a large publication so it was fun to see Soul Pancake’s video with our two elders playing their little Christmas hearts out.

Here is what they said in their description:

We put a piano on a street corner with holiday sheet music, and waited to see what would happen. The result: some incredible moments of holiday cheer as strangers played music and sang together. This holiday season, we invite everyone to treat your fellow people with kindness, because you never know who you might end up coraling with next to the Holiday Pop-Up Piano 😉
Happy Holidays! Love, SoulPancake

Here is the video:

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Every year we set new years resolutions, some of them are wise and some are foolish, but most only last until mid-January.  Why? Well, I could write about how we don’t actually set goals correctly, and I did last year (Click here for how to set goals and achieve them). But this year I wanted to focus on worthwhile goals, I looked to the Brethren and found 5 New Years Resolutions every Latter-day Saint should consider in 2017.

1st. Read The Book Of Mormon Cover To Cover This Year.

The thing that shocked me the most as a missionary is how many members had never actually read the Book of Mormon cover to cover! Our mission president told us that the average convert only reads 34 pages of the Book of Mormon before baptism! It does not matter of you are a new convert, or if you are like everyone else and working on your ongoing conversion, strengthen it by reading the Book of Mormon cover to cover this year.

  • Tip. To reach this goal, strive to read the Book of Mormon every day, you can also listen to while driving or at the gym!

“Search the Book of Mormon and the words of the living prophets every day, every day, every day! It’s the key to spiritual survival and avoiding deception. Without it, we are spiritually lost.”
Elder Kevin W. Pearson

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2nd. Make 2017 The Year Of The Temple.

Only within the Temple can we receive the exalting ordinances that will enable to qualify for eternal life. It is imperative to our eternal progression that we strive to receive all the blessings the Temple has to offer.

One way we can make this year the “year of the temple” is by focusing on the importance of making and keeping Temple covenants. Another is to set a goal is to more frequently worship in the Temple!
Read the rest at MyLifeByGogoGoff.com

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Mormon Tabernacle Choir Trump Inauguration
Image from Mormon Newsroom of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir at the Bush inauguration in 1989.

Having already performed at three inaugural ceremonies and an additional three inaugural parades for presidents, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir will add another historic performance to their list at the start of the new year.

The U.S. Presidential Inauguration Committee invited the Mormon Tabernacle Choir to perform at the inauguration ceremony for President-Elect Donald Trump and Vice President-Elect Michael Pence on January 20, 2017, as Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States.

In response to this invitation, Ron Jarrett, president of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, told Mormon Newsroom“The Mormon Tabernacle Choir has a great tradition of performing at the inaugurals of U.S. presidents. Singing the music of America is one of the things we do best. We are honored to be able to serve our country by providing music for the inauguration of our next president.”

READ FULL STORY AT LDS LIVING.

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Steve Young Didn't Serve a Mission
Photo via ldsliving.com

In April of 1983, when Steve Young was a star quarterback at Brigham Young University, he miraculously survived a deadly car crash that took the life of a close family friend. The experience changed his life forever.

The semester had just ended, and Young was planning to fly home to Connecticut to visit his parents. But then he got a call from Bonne Simmons, his former bishop’s wife, who expressed concern about her daughter Jill driving home alone. She asked if Young would drive home with her daughter instead of fly.

Young agreed.

“The Simmons family was like my second family,” he says. “Jill was like a little sister.”

Another student joined them at the last minute, and the three of them began the road trip with Young taking the first shift.

“I drove through the night, and when we got to Nebraska in the morning, we switched,” Young recalls. With Simmons now driving, Young quickly fell asleep in the front passenger seat.

READ FULL ARTICLE ON LDS LIVING.