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Bryce and Nellie Jurgensmeier are an LDS couple who have been uploading videos to their YouTube channel for years now. They started out with only a few followers and over the last year have shot up to over 140,000 subscribers! We think a big part of why they attract more followers is because they consistently produce content that inspires you to be positive and to go out and go on your own adventure.

Yesterday, they uploaded a video that inspired us to create a post about it because we think that this should happen around every family’s table today and through the holidays. In this video, they invited strangers to eat a free dinner with them on one condition, they had to put their phone in a box and talk to people.

We loved the message so we want you to see the video:

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

We challenge you to keep your head up and your phone down today as you interact with your family and friends.

A Virus killing cancer cells

Every cancer cell was dead. Examining the tissue culture dish in his Penn State lab in 2008, BYU alumnus Craig M. Meyers (BS ’82, MS ’84) wasn’t sure what had happened. Seven days earlier those same cells had been alive and well. Meyers had directed an assistant to introduce a special virus (called adeno-associated virus type 2 [AAV2]) into the cell lines of cancerous human papillomavirus (HPV) cells and leave it all in an incubator. Now to see them all dead, he suspected they’d made a mistake.

“Our first thought was . . . that there was something wrong with the incubator,” says Meyers, a Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Penn State College of Medicine. “So we repeated [the test] multiple times, and it happened every time with multiple incubators.”

Since working on a microbiology PhD at UCLA nearly 30 years ago, Meyers has been on the front lines in the ongoing battle against HPV. This sexually transmitted virus leads to the growth of warts on various parts of the body and can result in several cancers, including cervical cancer.

Finding a virus that killed cancerous HPV cells was remarkable because, unlike HPV, there is little known about the AAV2 virus. There had been no crucial need for AAV2 research because, while the virus does infect humans, it has no known negative effect on the human body. However, in that tissue culture dish in 2008, Meyers discovered that AAV2 was somehow causing the HPV cancer cells to kill themselves.

Read the full story at BYU Magazine.

If you enjoy watching Prepare to Serve video interviews with returned missionaries, you should be pretty excited about this. Lifey.org will soon host custom-built, embeddable video players for each mission, so that you’ll be able to easily browse all the video interviews for each mission.

Here’s an example of what the mission video players look like:

It takes a good chunk of time to create 450 of these mission video players, so it may take until the end of the summer for them all to be completed, but we’re adding new mission video players every week.

Simply click on your mission in this Lifey LDS Mission Index to see what resource we’ve created for your mission so far.

And if you live in the Utah area and would like to share your mission stories on the Prepare to Serve YouTube channel, email [email protected] . Thanks!

If you were inspired and entertained by the new Saturday’s Warrior, you’re sure to be inspired and entertained by some of the stories Elder Kestler (Clint Pulver) shares in his new interactive video autobiography. Enjoy! Some of his mission stories are hilarious..just sayin’!

Here are 130+ of best quotes by LDS prophets.

Joseph Smith

1st LDS Church President, served 1830-1844

  • “When you climb up a ladder, you must begin at the bottom and ascend step by step, until you arrive at the top; and so it is with the principles of the Gospel– you must begin with the first, and go on until you learn all the principles of exaltation. But it will be a great while after you have passed through the veil before you will have learned them. It will be a great work to learn our salvation and exaltation even beyond the grave.”
  • “Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it; and this path is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, holiness, and keeping all the commandments of God.”
  • “Whatever God requires is right, no matter what it is, although we may not see the reason there of until all of the events transpire.”
  • “A man is saved no faster than he gains knowledge”
  • “When God commands, do it!”
  • “We say that God is true; that the Constitution of the United States is true; that the Bible is true; and that the Book of Mormon is true, and that Christ is true”
  • “The best way to obtain truth and wisdom is not to ask from books, but to go to God in prayer, and obtain divine teaching.”
  • “You don’t know me; you never knew my heart. No man knows my history. I cannot tell it: I shall never undertake it. I don’t blame any one for not believing my history. If I had not experienced what I have, I would not have believed it myself. I never did harm any man since I was born in the world. My voice is always for peace.”
  • “God himself, finding he was in the midst of spirits and glory, because he was more intelligent, saw proper to institute laws whereby the rest could have a privilege to advance like himself. The relationship we have with God places us in a situation to advance in knowledge. He has power to institute laws to instruct the weaker intelligences, that they may be exalted with Himself, so that they might have one glory upon another, and all that knowledge, power, glory, and intelligence, which is requisite in order to save them in the world of spirits. (King Follett Discourse) ”
  • “It is our duty to concentrate all our influence to make popular that which is sound and good, and unpopular that which is unsound. ”
  • “God judges men according to the use they make of the light which He gives them.”

—View the 130+ top quotes by LDS prophets—

Here are 300+ of the best quotes by President Henry B. Eyring, organized by topic (A-Z). These quotes represent some of President Eyring’s most powerful messages from General Conference talks, First Presidency messages, BYU Devotionals, etc.

quotes-president-eyring

Quotes About Education By President Henry B. Eyring

Quotes From “Education For Real Life” (May 2001 CES Fireside)

  • When we put God’s purposes first, He will give us miracles. If we pray to know what He would have us do next, He will multiply the effects of what we do in such a way that time seems to be expanded.
  • It takes neither modern technology nor much money to seize the opportunity to learn in the moments we now waste. You could just have a book and paper and pencil with you. That will be enough. But you need determination to capture the leisure moments you now waste.
  • Too often we use many hours for fun and pleasure, clothed in the euphemism “I’m recharging my batteries.” Those hours could be spent reading and studying to gain knowledge, skills, and culture.
  • Our education must never stop. If it ends at the door of the classroom on graduation day, we will fail.
  • We cannot waste time entertaining ourselves when we have the chance to read or to listen to whatever will help us learn what is true and useful. Insatiable curiosity will be our hallmark.
  • A great teacher is always studying.

—-View all 300+ quotes from President Henry B. Eyring—-

Here are some of the best LDS Pick-up lines around.

  1. “What’s your favorite temple? I’m looking at mine!”
  2. “A date with me is like a temple, and you have a recommend.”
  3. “I was reading the Book of Numbers last night, and I realized I don’t have yours.”
  4. “I will treat you how I treat my scriptures. With care and love.”
  5. “You are my Pearl of Great Price.” 
  6. “Are you the iron rod? Cause I wanna hold onto you for the rest of eternity.”
    -1 Nephi 8:24 “And it came to pass that I beheld others pressing forward, and they came forth and caught hold of the end of the rod of iron; and they did press forward through the mist of darkness, clinging to the rod of iron, even until they did come forth and partake of the tree.”
  7. “The tree of life called. It wants its sweetness back.”
    1 Nephi 8: 10-11 “And it came to pass that I beheld a tree whose fruit was desireable to make one happy. And it came to pass that I did go forth and partake of the fruit thereof; and I beheld that it was most sweet, above all that I ever before tasted.”
  8. “You remind me of the fruit in Lehi’s dream. You are the most precious of all.”
    1 Nephi: 15:36 “Wherefore, the wicked are rejected from the righteous, and also from that tree of life, whose fruit is most precious and most desireable above all other fruits.”

**View all of the 50+ LDS Pick-Up Lines**

In 1975, Dr. Raymond A. Moody coined the term “near-death experiences” in his bestselling book Life After Life.

Mormons have latched on to this concept, which is not surprising, considering our unique doctrine regarding the afterlife.

Dr. Brent Top has researched extensively near-death experiences, especially by those outside of the LDS community.

He has identified several common elements to these experiences such as the “life review,” encountering loved ones, and spirit communication.

Far from fading as a fad, the topic is becoming more and more popular.

While Dr. Top finds his studies interesting, he warns of the danger of trying to establish doctrine through experience. He emphasizes what the LDS doctrine is regarding the afterlife rather than anecdotal experiences. He also introduces a concept he coined as the “Apocraphal Principle” to help us evaluate these stories.

 

In the LDS Church, we have high expectations and high ideals. Leaders do not shy away from teaching a very specific ideal family constellation, sexual purity before marriage, and patterning our life after the Savior’s life in every possible way. There is nothing wrong with teaching ideals and one could argue that that is the primary job of religious institutions. However, in real life, holding up ideals often leaves members never feeling  “good enough” because they have not achieved the ideal righteous Mormon life. Chronic feelings of  “never good enough” because your life doesn’t look like an Ensign magazine cover, your child has left the Church, your spouse isn’t committed to church callings, you’re struggling with the word of wisdom, you’re having difficulty forgiving someone, you’re not a good provider, or you’re not an attentive mother or father, can erode our whole sense of self.

What is shame?

Shame is a universal emotion defined by researcher Brené Brown, PhD as “the intensely painful feeling or experience of believing that we are flawed and therefore unworthy of love and belonging – something we’ve experienced, done, or failed to do makes us unworthy of connection.” Shame inspires us to hide ourselves from others, to judge ourselves and to go deeper into secretive behaviors.

Shame triggers

Religious institutions are not the only place we get messages about ideals. We are bombarded with messages about how we “should” be–what ideal women and men look like and act like, what the ideal house and household looks like, how your children should behave and more. Not living up to our ideal identity or how we want to view ourselves and be viewed by others has been identified as the primary trigger for shame.

One of my ideal identities is the desire to be viewed as a “good mother.” If I am not behaving as a “good mother” – if I’m being preoccupied with work, forgetting their doctor appointment, or losing my patience– my ideal identity is challenged and I am susceptible to feelings of shame. Shame can be triggered not only by how we view ourselves, but also by how we think others view us.

What’s wrong with shame?

You may be thinking, “What’s the problem with feeling shame when you don’t measure up to your ideal? Doesn’t that make you want to change?” No, shame does not inspire self-improvement. It most often initiates and fuels self-destructive behavior. Chronic feelings of shame are present in toxic perfectionism, eating disorders, problematic sexual behaviors, substance abuse, and sexual abuse. Over time, shame can become integrated into our self-image, into our core experience of who we are (not what we have done).

Where shame gets particularly tricky for Mormons is that while we can discount the world’s messages about our ideal selves as shallow, uninspired and sometimes downright evil, faithful members can’t easily discount the ideals put forward by inspired Church leaders. Nor should we. How do we accept the ideals set forth by our Church leaders without spiraling into self-destructive shame because we don’t measure up?

1. Draw clear distinctions between ideal and real

I am not suggesting that we throw away the ideals presented by our doctrine and teachings. What I am suggesting is that we overtly discuss that the image of an ideal family, ideal mother, ideal priesthood holder, ideal child or teen as something to strive for, not to actually achieve anytime soon. I have seen the damaging consequences of believing that the religious ideal is actually attainable in this life contribute to destructive perfectionism, depression, anxiety, low self-worth, and shame. Dr. Brené Brown suggests that “healthy striving” toward a goal is very different than toxic perfectionism.

As an adolescent, I recognized my blessed and privileged life and yet, for a period of time, I still wasn’t happy. I concluded that something must be inherently wrong with me. I started to experience deep feelings of shame–that I was somehow flawed because I went through periods where I wasn’t able to feel joy and gratitude. I have the Gospel. I should be happy. I slid into several years of toxic perfectionism, denying my emotions, and hiding my authentic self.

Read full story by Dr. Julie De Azevedo Hanks on Meridian Magazine.